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Facts for Kids

cueagleIn VENEZUELA, the Harpy Eagle Conservation Program (HECP) has surveyed and mapped more than 30 nests of the Harpy Eagle in the lowlands south of the Orinoco River and east of Lake Guri. The largest “cluster” of nests (n=9) is located east of the town of El Palmar in the Rio Grande area of the Sierra Imataca. At least 18 other breeding sites have been identified in or adjacent to the Imataca Forest Reserve, including a site reported on top of the Nuria escarpment and four others near Bochinche to the southeast (near the border with Guyana). HECP is also monitoring four other nests situated >100 km southwest of Imataca in the Supamo River drainage.

In PANAMA by 1996, HECP had reliable reports of more than a dozen nests in the Darien Province. HECP also began surveying the Atlantic slope north of Panama City, with three nests reported in Chagres National Park since 1995.

NEST SPACING: (distance between active nests):

  • Darien/Panama (6 nests) less than 4 km, alternate nests separated by 1.3 km.
  • SE Venezuela (17 nests) nearest neighbors are 6.6 km apart (n=5), alternate nests are 1.2 km

HOME RANGE: HECP has tracked a breeding pair of Harpy Eagles with satellite transmitters in Venezuela (February 96-April 97). Fourteen locations obtained for the female were within 10 km from the nest. Minimal data on the male (7 locations) indicated the pair shared the habitat.

In Panama HECP is tracking a breeding male with a solar satellite transmitter since March 2000.

MORE FACTS: If you need more information on Harpy Eagles and you can’t find what you need on or from this page, contact:

Dr. Eduardo Alvarez
EM.Org Trustee
PO Box 15251,
Gainesville, FL  32604  USA
Telefax 352.378.5318
harpia@attglobal.net

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Kid’s Activities

eacrafaWould you like to be a Harpy Eagle Bio-Ranger?  Complete some of the activities below:

  1. Do some “research.”
    A. Go to some of the links on this page to learn about the Harpy Eagle and its home, the rainforest.
    B. Go to your library and read some books about the Harpy Eagle and the rainforest.
    C. Interview or talk to someone you know who can tell you about the Harpy Eagle or the rainforest.  Take some notes on important things they say.
  2. Take “field notes.”  Most of you won’t be able to go to the rainforest to take field notes, but for practice you can take notes when you go on a hike or walk, explore the nearest park, or even in your own back yard.
    In your field notes, write down things like:
    A. What’s the date?
    B.  Where are you?  In the forest?  In your backyard? I n a desert?  On an island?
    C. What’s the weather like?  Is it sunny, cloudy, or partly cloudy?  Is it raining or snowing?  How hard is the wind blowing?  Hard enough to fly a kite, or just a little bit?
    D. Is it warm or cold?  What is the temperature?
    E.  What kinds of plants do you see?  Grass? trees? shrubs? weeds?  Is there more ground than plants?  How much more?  What’s the percentage of plant cover?
    F. What animals, birds, reptile, bugs, or spiders do you see?  How many?  What are they doing–flying, crawling, being still, trying to hide?
    G. What are you doing when you see an animal, bird, reptile, bug or spider?  Are you sitting and watching?  Are you walking quietly?
    H. Draw pictures of what you see.  Or, if you have a camera, take photos.  Label the pictures or photos so you don’t forget what they are, where you were, and what you where doing.

    Click here for a blank Field Notes page that you can fill in.  You need Adobe® Acrobat Reader™ to print these pages.  You can download Adobe Acrobat Reader FREE by clicking here.

    Here’s a sample of Antonio Fernandini’s field notes.  He’s a biologist in Peru.  His notes are in Spanish.  Even if you don’t read Spanish you can get a good idea of what he was looking at in the field.  What do you see in the picture that Antonio has drawn?

  3. antonioNotesWrite a report or do a presentation:

  • Organize the information that you’ve gathered.
  • Share it with your friends or classmates and teacher. Share it with your scout troop, if you’re a scout.
  • To make it interesting, include some pictures from this website.  Click here to go to the EM.Org Photos page.
  • Be sure to give credit to books and websites (like this one) where you gather your information.

When you’re finished with the activities above, you’re a Harpy Eagle Bio-Ranger!!!  Click here to see the official Harpy Eagle Bio-Ranger certificate.  You need Adobe® Acrobat Reader™ to print this certificate.  You can download Adobe Acrobat Reader FREE by clicking here.

Print the certificate, add your name, and have it signed by someone like your teacher, parents, or scout leader to verify that you’re a Harpy Eagle Bio-Ranger.

 

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Harpy Eagle and Rainforest Books

Click here to go to the EM.Org list of publications and references.

Check your library or go to an Internet distributor like Amazon.com for these books listed Camilo climbsbelow.  Most of them are for grade school kids.

  • Angel Falls: A South American Journey, by Martin and Tanis Jordan, 1995,  ISBN 1-85697-541-X
  • Amazon Diary: The Jungle Adventures of Alex Winters, by Hudson Talbott and Mark Greenberg, 1996, ISBN 0-698-11699-2
  • The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest, by Lynne Cherry, 1990, ISBN 0-15-200520-X
  • A Guide for Using The Great Kapok Tree in the Classroom, Teacher Created Materials, Inc., ISBN 1-57690-084-3
  • Here Is the Tropical Rain Forest, by Madeleine Dunphy and Michael Rothman, 1994, ISBN 0-7868-1212-5
  • The Shaman’s Apprentice: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest, by Lynne Cherry and Mark J. Plotkin, 1998, ISBN 0-15-201281-8
  • A Walk in the Rainforest, by Kristin Joy Pratt, 1992, ISBN 1-878265-99-7
  • A Teacher’s Guide to A Walk in the Rainforest, Sharing Nature with Children Series by Dawn Publications, ISBN 1-883220-74-2

Look for a new Harpy Eagle book to be published sometime this year–2002–as part of the Animals of the Rain Forest series, by Compass International.  E-mail Christy Steele for more information.

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Harpy Eagle and Related Links

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For More Facts

If you need more information on Harpy Eagles and you can’t find what you need on or from this page, contact:

Dr. Eduardo Alvarez
EM.Org Trustee
PO Box 15251,
Gainesville, FL  32604  USA
Telefax 352.378.5318
harpia@attglobal.net

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